Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Bomber Jacket, Ten Months Late



Back when Rigel Bomber Jacket January was happening, oh, ten months ago, I was seriously sleep deprived, so I didn't have enough brain power to do more than glance at pictures and think, "Hmm, that looks like something I'd like to make, but with a higher neck." I filed the idea of a bomber jacket somewhere in my mind palace, and probably would have forgotten about it if it weren't for Tanit-Isis' cream lace bomber. I have a serious crush on everything she makes, so when I saw her non-collarbone-exposing jacket (why have a jacket that's so v-necked? I mean I guess you could wear a scarf, but it just seems weird to me), I decided I really needed to make my own. I collected McCall's 7100 at the next Jo-Ann's pattern sale, but every time I had the mental energy to think about finding an appropriate fabric, SHB was sleeping, and fabric bins are all in his room, so it wasn't until July that IG sewcialists helped me match a fabric to the pattern. In fact, it was Sewprettyinpink's version that finally tipped me over the edge because I'm pretty sure her fabric is exactly the same as mine!





After reading all the pattern reviews about how it runs small, I decided to cut a medium instead of my usual small. Good thing I did, because once I added in my lining, it's quite snug. In fact, if I were to make this again, I might even go up to a large if I use really bulky fabrics. Anyway, I cut out my jacket pieces, couldn't decide what I wanted to use as a lining fabric, and then stalled again because school started and then I was making play costumes. After the madness of the play (I will share pictures of the costumes soon!), I wanted to make something for me, so jacket it was! Since it's gotten so cold (don't laugh, Tanit-Isis of the #whinycanuck in wintertime hashtag, but it's in the low 50s and this California girl is dying), I went ahead and made a fleece lining. I was a little worried at first about not being able to slide my arms in and out of the sleeves easily, but ohhhhh the warm loveliness of fleece! I regret nothing, even if I always have to do an awkward tug to pull my sleeves down inside.



To add the lining, I just cut another set of the body pieces and stitched the front facing on top. In retrospect, I would have taken the time (all of two minutes, seriously, past me, are you really that lazy?) to trim the fleece out from under the facing pieces, because my seams got really, really bulky. Houndstooth + heavy jacket zipper + more houndstooth + interfacing + fleece + another layer of interfaced houndstooth = no actual lowering of the presser foot when I pressed the lever. Since the original pattern doesn't call for a lining, I had to improvise my steps, and when I finished I realized that I had bag-lined my jacket without any directions! Including that weird sleeve bit that I never understood in diagrams before! I know people bag-line jackets all the time and it's really not a big deal, but I'm secretly (publicly) proud of myself for visualizing and executing the procedure without having to look it up.




Summary
Pattern: McCall's 7100, with a lining added
Fabric: Three yards of 44" wide cotton houndstooth fabric, quite loosely woven and drape-y, from a donated stash, and 1 yard of 60" wide gray microfleece, from Jo-Ann's
Notions: I wasn't sure where I was going to get the ribbing for the cuffs, collar, and hipband, because I didn't want this jacket to look Becky Home-Ecky, so sweatshirt fleece from the stash wasn't cutting it. Enter WAWAK, a dry-cleaning supply company that also does sewing notions. They were recommended to me before by other sewists years ago, but I kept forgetting to look them up. I decided to try out their "garment enhancers" (their catalog's words, not mine), and you guys, this ribbing looks so real. I'm so glad to have discovered them!

Ribbed collar band, courtesy of WAWAK. I also added a little back facing piece so that I could attach a hanging loop.  

Cuffs and a close up of the faux welt pocket.
Ribbed bottom band and antiqued brass zipper.
Hours: I've gotten really bad at keeping track ever since SHB came along and my projects take weeks to complete. I'm going to estimate fifteen hours?
Total cost: The houndstooth was gifted from another stash, and the notions (about $7 worth) were provided free of charge by WAWAK, so it was just the fleece lining, about $6.
Will you make it again? I don't know that I need more than one bomber jacket, but it was a pretty easy and satisfying make (there's something about sewing your own outerwear that's especially rewarding), so I could totally see myself making another one at some point.
Final thoughts: As I said above, I am really pleased with making such a real-looking jacket! It's surprisingly cozy, too, which is nice, and while some may look down on the faux welt pockets, I liked that they were so simple (anything that doesn't require brainpower is a plus for me these days) but still look relatively good. I feel like I'm using all the English teacher blacklist words -- nice! good! -- but I think that's okay (look, there's another one!) because this is such a normal jacket. I toyed with the idea of a colorful lining or even fun pocket fabric, but in the end I just opted to use all the black, white, and gray fabrics from my stash. Which is fine (gah, can't stop) because it matches everything!


The whole time I was trying to take pictures of this jacket, SHB was wandering around squealing in excitement; apparently the self-timer function on the camera amuses him to no end.



Fancy your own ten-month-late bomber jacket? If you order your garment enhancers from WAWAK, for the month of December you can use the code WCD1215 for 10% off your order of $40 or more. If you're worried that you can't find $40 worth of stuff to order, allow me to offer you reassurances: you will find plenty of things! (Stuff, things...I am really working that English teacher blacklist.) I'm already making my own list (and checking it twice?); I love that I can get hair canvas and glow in the dark thread and a leather hole punch and brass blazer buttons all from one place. Seriously, looking through their catalog is like the sewing adult version of a Christmas toy catalog. Merry Christmas to yourself, anyone?


25 comments:

  1. I love Wawak! It's the cheapest place to buy serger cones (Maxi Lock ones!). I also buy my zippers (YKK) from them too. If you order over a certain amount, you get free s&h.

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    1. Good to know re: the serger cones! Maybe now I can get colors other than black, gray, and white!

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  2. Oooh, it's so classic! I'm glad you found time to finish it!!

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    1. Thanks! I find myself reaching for it again and again since it goes with everything. Who knew it's what I was missing in my wardrobe?

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  3. Very cute and I love the idea of fleece insides.

    Yeah. My yarn stash is in Taco's room. It's not ideal. But do you find that even though you have less time to sew, you are more productive in the time you get to sew?

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    1. Yes! I feel like ever since I became a mom, my productivity has skyrocketed because I know I only have a very limited amount of time.

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  4. I love the English Teacher Blacklist :) You're too funny.
    Nice jacket, I am very impressed with the bag lining (I still haven't dared, even with directions...)

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    1. I think bag lining is one of those things that seems really scary in theory, esp. when reading directions and looking at the diagrams of convoluted inside out pieces, but when you have the jacket in front of you at that stage it makes more sense.

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  5. Wow I'm really impressed with the craftsmanship!!! Technical genius at work!

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    1. Haha thanks! I don't know about technical genius, but I do enjoy a good 3D puzzle!

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  6. Looks so good! I love the fleece lining. Now I need to make a new version with fleece lining, too. :)

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    1. I wonder if you could just insert one into yours...maybe a little more hand-sewing than if you lined it earlier in the sewing process, but still doable if it will preserve your seam allowances?

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  7. My next jacket is probably going to take me ten months because I keep adding and subtracting features. It will have satiny lined sleeves, as I am tired of dragging sleeve over sleeve here in the damp NW (30-40F, damp again).
    I am impressed you got this done. Toddler years are hella hard to make stuff during.

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    1. I always love the idea of satiny sleeve lining, but balk at the actual making of them since I hate cutting that shifty stuff. Good luck with yours!

      In the week since I finished this jacket, SHB has been showing signs of dropping down to only one afternoon nap, which means even less time for me to sew :(

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  8. WAWAK sounds like that little duck noise mom and dad made at each other sometimes :P

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  9. That is seriously wonderful lining. I need to read your post after waking up, because you explained how you did it. I wish my linings would work that well. Bagging out usually is "too short" in some area. Argh. And I liked geometry.

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    1. I always cut my linings extra long to prevent that too-short disaster. Good luck with getting yours to work!

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  10. This looks great and I am SO flattered to be an inspiration! ;) I'd say that's a prodigious accomplishment for #sewingwithtoddlers! :D also double++ for the fleece lining... I haven't been able to take off my fleece-lined sweater in weeks (which is bad because it's white and REALLY needs to be washed...) ;)

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    1. I have exactly one fleece sweater that has the same problem; I keep thinking I should make another one, but it's such boring sewing :P

      You are an inspiration for a lot of the things I sew, so get used to it ;)

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  11. Love the high neck on your version. It wasn't until I made the Rigel that I realized how useless the neckline was. I wore my Rigel yesterday and my neck was freezing even with a scarf.

    Wish that I had gone your route (high neck, $1 pattern on-sale). Sometimes I'm too much on the indie bandwagon. I think that I persuaded myself to shell out on it because of the geometric sleeve detail version. It does look cool, so I'm glad that I made it. Definitely need to raise the neckline next make.

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    1. Yeah, I really want to support indies, but not at the expense of my neck warmth ;)

      The geometric pattern is definitely cool, but if I were honest with myself I would never actually take the time to do all that fabric coordinating and cutting!

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  12. Lovely jacket! And yay for hidden polka-dots and warm fleece-lining!

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